Layered Security Unites Defenses to Protect Data

NCSAMWhen you think of October, you probably think of football, Halloween, warm days and cool nights, but did you know that October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month?

And, just like layering your clothes protects you from chilly mornings while allowing you to adjust for warmer afternoons, a holistic approach to security that layers your technology, processes and training can protect you from gaps in your defense.

Layered security unites multiple security controls and defenses to safeguard your network and data against threats by combining several mitigating security measures to protect you from end-point to cloud.

A security breach can occur at any level, so combining firewalls, encryption, user and data classification, logging and monitoring, training, assessments and other security measures to protect, detect and respond to attacks improves your company’s ability to stay ahead of emerging threats.

The concept of layered security can be likened to how we protect our homes from intruders.

We try to remember to lock the windows and the doors, but, in case we forget or in case some enterprising thief easily picks the locks, we further safeguard our most valuable items within the home by hiding them, protecting them with alarms or guard dogs or vaulting them in safes.

The same is true of typical Internet-attached networks designed with security in mind.

Routers, firewalls and intrusion detection systems (IDS) protect the network from outsiders who might threaten to come in while Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) systems and human monitors watch to see if anomalies are occurring on the network.

A good security policy also limits the keys to the home (and to the safes and cabinets inside the home) by designating which user has access to what data. And to make sure we haven’t missed an open door or another threat vector, we audit our actions for quality control.

Just like we tell our kids to avoid strangers, we also warn our employees and co-workers to stay away from unexpected emails and/or email attachments, avoid unsecure websites and be vigilant about not divulging company secrets or customer data.

This year is the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s fifth year of recognizing Cyber Security Awareness Month. Homeland Security will celebrate it by promoting general security awareness, providing resources to create a culture of cyber security at work and promoting careers in cyber security.

Sword & Shield wants to help you develop the best practices toward protecting your business and your customers’ personal information.

To find out how we can help you protect, detect and defend your organization, email us at secureme@swordshield.com or call us at 865-244-3500.

 


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